Eric MacDonald

Biography

Eric MacDonald is an Associate Professor who teaches environmental design history and landscape management in the college’s landscape architecture and historic preservation programs. His research focuses on American environmental history, and cultural landscape management. This work has been supported by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Ford Motor Company Fund, and a Fellowship in Garden and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. His professional experience includes cultural landscape documentation and management plans for Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore, Voyageurs National Park, and the grounds of the Wisconsin state capitol. In 2009 he co-founded the College of Environment and Design’s Cultural Landscape Laboratory, which initiated cultural landscape research and planning at Hyde Farm in metropolitan Atlanta, Wormsloe Plantation near Savannah, Georgia, and Stratford Hall Plantation on Virginia’s Northern Neck peninsula. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Alliance for Historic Landscape Preservation. Since 2011, he has coordinated the Tanyard Creek Chew Crew, a student-led initiative to test the ecological, social, and cultural dimensions of prescribed grazing as a landscape management technique.

Degrees Held

Ph.D., Land Resources, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Master of Architecture, University of Michigan
Master of Urban Planning, University of Michigan
BS, Architecture, University of Michigan

Research Interests

Environmental history, historical ecology, and sustainable landscape management

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Mark Reinberger

Biography

Mark Reinberger, Ph.D., a professor in the College of Environment and Design at the University of Georgia, has over thirty years experience in the fields of architecture and historic preservation. He holds degrees in architectural history, historic preservation, and the history of urban planning from the University of Virginia and Cornell University, spent fifteen years in architectural firms specializing in historic architecture, and has taught for twenty-five years in schools of architecture and environmental design, including twenty-one years at the University of Georgia. His research specialty is American architecture, particularly of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries but with many forays into twentieth-century material. He is widely published in both books and scholarly journals, and his The Philadelphia Country House: Architecture and Landscape in Colonial America will be published in 2015 by Johns Hopkins University Press.

Degrees Held

Ph.D. Cornell University, 1988: Architectural History, History of Urban Planning, Art History
M.A. Cornell University, 1982: Architectural History and Preservation
B.A. University of Virginia, 1977: Architectural History

Research Interests

American Architecture and Urban Planning
Vernacular Architecture
Building Materials Conservation

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Scott Nesbit

Biography

Scott Nesbit is an assistant professor of digital humanities at the University of Georgia’s College of Environment and Design. His work explores the intersection between digital tools and humanistic questions, particularly questions touching on the history and spaces of the American South. He earned a PhD in history at the University of Virginia in 2013, where he wrote about the geography of slavery and emancipation in the Civil War South. From 2009 until 2014 he was the associate director of the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond. He has led digital history projects such as Visualizing Emancipation, which used a wide array of textual sources—ranging from military correspondence to runaway slave advertisements found in southern newspapers–to map out where and when slavery fell apart during the American Civil War.

Degrees Held

2013 Ph.D., History, University of Virginia: Dissertation Title: “The Irony of Emancipation in the Civil War South”
2005 M.A., History, University of Virginia
2001 B.A., Latin, Swarthmore College

Research Interests

Historic Preservation; Public History; Civil War Era; Digital Humanities; GIS

Selected Publications

2015 Mapping Occupation: Force, Freedom, and the Army in Reconstruction website, coauthor with Gregory P. Downs.

2013 “Creating Deep Maps and Spatial Narratives through Design,” with Mia Ridge and Don Lafreniere, International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing 7 (October 2013): 176-189.
2013 “Visualizing Emancipation: Mapping the End of Slavery in the American Civil War,” in Justyna Zander and Pieter J. Mosterman, eds., Computation for Humanity: Information Technology to Advance Society (New York: Taylor & Francis), 427-435.
2012 Visualizing Emancipation website, http://dsl.richmond.edu/emancipation
2011 “Seeing Emancipation: Scale and Freedom in the American South” with Edward L. Ayers, Journal of the Civil War Era, 1, no. 1 (March 2011): 3-24.

Organizations

Society for Civil War Historians; Southern Historical Association; American Historical Association

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Wayde Brown

Biography

Wayde Brown grew up in Nova Scotia, Canada. After studying architecture at Dalhousie University, he worked in architectural offices in Canada and in the African nation of Lesotho. Subsequently, he undertook post-graduate studies in Britain, and holds a Master’s degree in architectural conservation from the University of York, and a PhD in the history and theory of architecture from the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff. For thirteen years Wayde worked for the Province of Nova Scotia, as manager of built heritage programs. He has been at the University of Georgia since 2002, and is currently associate professor. At UGA, Wayde has served on many university committees, and was previously Assistant Dean for Research within the College of Environment & Design. He participates in several preservation and architecture related organizations, both in the US and abroad, and is a professional member of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. He has presented his research at scholarly conferences in Canada, Britain, Australia, and Sweden, as well as the United States.

Degrees Held

PhD – Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff University
MA (architectural Conservation) – Institute of Advanced Architectural Studies, University of York
BArch – Dalhousie University
BEDS (environmental design ) – Dalhousie University

Research Interests

History of the historic preservation / heritage conservation movement; development and interpretation of ‘historic sites’, especially the use/role of reconstructions and simulacra; ‘unofficial’ historic sites, and the relationship between historic sites and collective memory, and the many ways in which the past is employed to legitimize the present.

Personal Interests

History of the preservation movement, historic site interpretation, and twentieth century heritage

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Cari Goetcheus

Biography

Cari L. Goetcheus, Associate Professor in the College of Environment + Design, teaches in the graduate Historic Preservation Program. With training in both Landscape Architecture and Historic Preservation, Cari’s expertise lies in cultural landscape research, documentation and management.

Prior to her academic career, Ms. Goetcheus worked in both the public and private sectors. As a Historical Landscape Architect with the National Park Service in Atlanta, GA and Washington, D.C., Cari worked with the Cultural Landscape Inventory (CLI) program. In Washington, D.C. she further worked with NPS regional colleagues to assist the then 396 national parks with a variety of cultural landscape issues. In private practice, Ms. Goetcheus worked in both traditional landscape architecture offices on master plans, site designs and construction drawings, as well as in preservation firms known for their cultural landscape work and developing National Heritage Areas. On a volunteer basis at the national level, Cari was instrumental in developing the Historic American Landscape Survey (HALS) program and its documentation guidelines.

With 25 years of experience in research, planning, preservation, and project management, Ms. Goetcheus is a licensed landscape architect in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the State of Georgia. Current and past research projects include: directing theUGA Cultural Landscape Laboratory; partnering with ten Gullah Geechee communities in coastal South Carolina to document the tangible and intangible qualities of their historic communities; guiding consultants to develop the Getty Foundation funded Clemson University Preservation Master Plan; development of cultural resource documentation for a c. 1785 property on the Clemson University campus; working with students to craft a Scenic Byway Management Guide for Sumter National Forest, and contributing to an Environmental Impact Assessment Report for Dyea, Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Skagway, Alaska.

Degrees Held

Master of Historic Preservation, University of Georgia
Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, Utah State University
Associates in Applied Science (Landscape Development), State University of New York-Cobleskill

Research Interests

Goetcheus’ research interests include landscape preservation education, vernacular and ethnographic land use history, and specifically the impact of African American culture on the landscapes of the South-eastern United States

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James K. Reap

Biography

James K. Reap, is Professor and Graduate Coordinator of the Master of Historic Preservation Program. He was director of the University of Georgia Croatia Study Abroad Program (2007-13) and is an affiliated faculty member of the UGA African Studies Institute. Professor Reap taught law and heritage conservation as a Fulbright Scholar at the Jordan University of Science and Technology and as a visiting professor at the Orenburg Institute of the Moscow State Law Academy. In 2016, he was appointed by President Obama to a three-year term on the Cultural Property Advisory Committee.

He is past President and current Secretary General of the Committee on Legal, Administrative and Financial Issues of the International Council of Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) and a Fellow and Legal Advisor of US/ICOMOS. He is serving as an Officer of the ICOMOS Scientific Council, an organization of all ICOMOS international scientific committees. He has worked on preservation issues in Eastern and Southern Europe, Central Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and the Caribbean.

Professor Reap is currently a board member of the United States Committee of the Blue Shield and a past board member of the Lawyers’ Committee for Cultural Heritage Preservation, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation and Preservation Action. He has provided training and technical assistance to preservation commissions throughout the United States. Professor Reap has served as chair of the preservation commissions in the City of Decatur and DeKalb County and as vice chair in Athens, Georgia. He is a founding member of both the Georgia Alliance and National Alliance of Preservation Commissions, and is a former board member of both organizations. He has served previously as President of the Athens (Georgia) Historical Society and the Athens-Clarke Heritage Foundation.

His background in planning includes service as Georgia’s first regional preservation planner and as Deputy Executive Director of the Northeast Georgia Area Planning and Development Commission (now Northeast Georgia Regional Commission.) He has served in several Georgia state agencies including Departments of Archives and History, Natural Resources, and Technical and Adult Education (now the Technical College System of Georgia).

Degrees Held

JD, University of Georgia
BA, American Studies, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

Research Interests

Legal, financial and administrative issues of heritage conservation. International organizations and issues in heritage conservation.

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